Species Law

An Introduction to Species Law

This section allows students to study and learn about caribou, sage-grouse, fish, and other mammals but more importantly it focuses on how the law is (or sometimes isn’t) protecting these species and their homes. Federal and provincial governments often disagree about who should be responsible for species management – a fight which is ultimately lost …


Species & the Law

Canada is the second largest country on Earth and due to its immense size and physical location, Canada has a wide diversity of ecosystems, ranging from rainforests and beaches to grasslands and the arctic tundra. This diversity provides Canada with a rich natural heritage and with a seemingly endless supply of natural resources. Unfortunately, the …


Categories of Species at Risk

Now that you know what a ‘species’ is, let’s figure out what it means when they are considered ‘at risk’… In Alberta, the Wildlife Act defines an endangered species in Section 1(i) of the Act, as, “a kind of endangered animal, a kind of invertebrate prescribed as an endangered invertebrate, a kind of plant, alga …


The Definition of ‘Habitat’

There are different definitions of ‘habitat’ at both the federal and provincial levels. This affects the protections available for species and their respective habitats. The federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) defines habitat as, “(a) in respect of aquatic species, spawning grounds and nursery, rearing, food supply, migration and any other areas on which aquatic species …


A Brief History of Species at Risk or Habitat Law in Canada

Species at risk and habitat law in Alberta (and Canada as a whole) has a fairly recent history. This history, with its international roots, is briefly outlined below: i. UN Convention on Biological Diversity in 1992: In December 1992, Canada ratified the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity and by doing so, shifted the focus …


Which laws apply to species at risk in Alberta?

In Alberta, the culmination of the history of species at risk/habitat law can be found in the Wildlife Act. This is the primary provincial law governing species and species at risk. [1] Alberta is one of seven Canadian jurisdictions that have not yet enacted dedicated endangered species legislation. Rather, in order to comply with the …


Which laws apply to species at risk in Canada?

On the federal level, the primary species at risk legislation is the SARA. This is legislation which is meant to prevent species from becoming extinct or extirpated, provide for the recovery of species at risk, and ensure that species of special concern do not become threatened or endangered. [1] How does the Species at Risk Act work? …


Federalism & Species at Risk

In the Fundamentals of Law section, which can be found here and the Constitutional Law section which can be found here, you can find an overview of what federalism means in Canada and more particularly what it means for environmental law. If you need a quick refresher, go check out these sections and meet us …


Case Study: Caribou

When you think of Canada and its wildlife, there are a few iconic animal species that might immediately come to mind. Perhaps you think of the beaver, the grizzly bear, or the orca. This next section will look at another one of the most important and recognizable Canadian animal species: the caribou. Canadian caribou are …


Section Review

Now that you have finished this section on Species, you should be comfortable: Understanding the difference between categories of species at risk Describing the history of species at risk law in Canada Describing the Wildlife Act and its role in Alberta Understanding the difference between the legislative provisions in the Wildlife Act and the provincial …


 

Species Law

Curriculum Connections

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